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Bletchley Park

Meet the amazing code-breaking women

Bletchley Park, Britain’s top code-breaking centre during World War Two, employed around 10,000 people. By 1945, 75% of them were women. Many worked as top codebreakers, selected for their academic achievements in maths, science and languages but few have had the recognition of their male peers. In this Pod, we explore the history of Bletchley Park, the impact its astonishing code breaking activities on the war and importantly, the stories of the women who worked there.

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Conspiracy Theories

Is the truth out there?

Are they a new phenomenon fuelled by the internet and social media or have they been around much longer than that? In this Pod, we track the origins of conspiracy theories, see why they work and why certain groups of people are more susceptible to them and, if all else fails, how to resist them!  We also hear a powerful piece from the victims of conspiracy theories.

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Cults

They’ve been around for centuries but why?

Cults are certainly having a moment but aren’t they always? The word first entered the English language in 1614 but they still fascinate us today. The Sincheong Church is being blamed for the spread of coronavirus in South Korea; Bhagwan Shree Rajneesah, was the subject of hit Netflix series, Wild, Wild Country; Charles Mason was depicted in Hollywood movie, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and the book Cult X, about the sarin attack on the Tokyo subway, was a massive bestseller. We look into the lure of the cult and hear from some of those who have escaped their clutches.

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Dark Tourism

What is it and why is it so popular?

Coined around 20 years ago for ‘tourists’ visiting sites, attractions or exhibitions made famous by death, suffering and disaster. Will Coldwell in the Guardian writes: ‘When it comes to holiday jaunts, the site of a nuclear disaster zone, the home of a serial killer or the execution chamber of a former state prison don’t scream “wish you were here”. But while it might not be everyone’s idea of fun, demand for macabre attractions and disturbing experiences that recreate horrific moments in history is growing – dark tourism is on the rise.’

The following pieces will open your eyes to the differing aspects of Dark Tourism and have you question the ethics and morals around it.

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Influencers

The ethics of social media influencers

Is it time to regulate social media influencers? Brands are pouring billions of pounds into partnering with influencers who can reach consumers on social media but many operate with no ethical framework. Whether it’s promoting products they don’t use or not declaring sponsored posts, this fast growing and largely unregulated practice is an ethical minefield. What are rules and is it possible to get it right? Who should we believe and when? And is it really the career of the future?

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Personality Types

Be the type of person you want to meet

Taking a personality test can be both fun and revealing. But how reliable are they and do they ever tell us anything we don’t already know? Being curious to understand ourselves better is part of human nature but can knowing more about our personality type really help us make better decisions or build stronger relationships? Personality assessments are also commonly used in the workplace, as part of an interview process or career development. But some complain of being sidelined, or even sacked, when the test doesn’t give the answer the employer is looking for. In this Pod, we explore how personality tests work, why we love them so much and how to use them wisely.

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Ruth Bader Ginsberg

From Supreme Court Justice to pop culture icon

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the history-making jurist, feminist icon and national treasure, has died, aged 87. Ginsberg was just the second female justice on the US Supreme Court and her 27 years on the bench was marked by a tireless fight to advance the rights of women and to ensure the promise of the constitution applied to all. She struggled against blatant sexism throughout her career as she climbed to the pinnacle of her profession. Despite maintaining a modest public profile, Ginsburg inadvertently became not just a celebrity, but a pop-culture heroine. She may only have been 5ft tall, but Ginsburg will be remembered as a legal giant.

Pod published Sept 2020.

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Self Publish A Book

Have you written a book or always wanted to?

Trying to get it published can be a long and demoralising process. This ‘How To’ Pod explores how to take control and publish the book yourself, the pros and cons of self-publishing vs traditional publishing, suggested steps, success stories and where to find resources and online guides that can help you.

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Sports Stories

Recovery stories in the face of adversity

Inspiring individuals from a variety of sports, who have suffered life changing injuries and set backs, share their stories of bravery, courage and determination.

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Thai Cave Rescue

The dramatic rescue of 12 boys from the Thai caves

In June 2019, twelve boys aged 11 to 16 and their football coach became trapped by rising flood waters in the Tham Luang cave network in Thailand. They were eventually found deep inside the caves ten days later, leading to one of the most difficult cave rescue attempts ever undertaken. Battling rising flood waters, miles of narrow caves and the fact that many of the boys couldn’t swim, the rescuers divers had to sedate them, connect them to dive tanks and stretcher them out one by one. Here we bring you the full story, including first hand accounts from those involved.

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The Theranos Scam

Blood, fraud and money

Claiming to have developed new diagnostic technology that would allow blood testing using one or two drops of blood, Theranos was poised to revolutionise the medical industry. At one time the company had a private valuation of over $8 Billion and Elizabeth Homes was touted as being the ‘Next Steve Jobs’ and was a familiar face on magazine covers and TV screens. However after a spectacular rise came a spectacular fall, Theranos was dissolved and Elizabeth Holmes indicted on charges of fraud. With her court case now delayed until Oct 2020, it’s an amazing story that we just can’t seem to get enough of.

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The World of Art

Viewed from all sides

There’s really no substitute for seeing artwork in the flesh, but the next best thing is getting to know everything about it in preparation for when you can.  Now is the perfect time to brush up on your art trivia to impress your pals with when the gallery doors open again. Whether you’re looking to buy art, learn more about the history, broaden your horizons or want to wade into the mysteries of the art world, here are some art podcasts, videos and articles to sink your teeth into.

The art market can seem like a daunting world, reserved for those with millions to spend on artworks by the biggest names in the business. But don’t be intimidated: everyone can enjoy buying and owning art in an affordable way.

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What is humour?

The science behind what makes us laugh

We Brits are famous for our sense humour but what exactly is it that makes us laugh and why? Laughter is a universally shared human response that is intrinsically linked with culture and communication styles. How does humour help us build relationships and resolve conflicts and can we be taught to be funny?

You might also like our British Comedy Collection

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Why we lie

The truth is we all do it but why?

Lying is an inherent part of being human and we all do it, everyday, to friends, family and work colleagues. From little white lies in order to be polite or protect the feelings of others, lies designed to hide our inadequacies or avoid blame, to the lies we tell ourselves about how we really feel, there are many types of lie and equally as many reasons why we do it. Children learn to lie from about the age of three and become accomplished liars by around the age of seven. So where is the line between socially acceptable lying and unacceptable deceit? Can you tell when someone is lying and why do some people develop into pathological liars?

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